MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award

MICHR has established this award in order to recognize and honor the efforts and accomplishments of faculty who demonstrate consistent, high quality research and career mentoring in areas of clinical and translational and health research.

This award recognizes the value to the University of Michigan in assisting early career investigators to reach across disciplinary boundaries in pursuit of science. It also recognizes the important role mentoring plays in ensuring the personal and professional development of a mentee. This award is part of MICHR’s continuing efforts to foster a culture of mentoring, especially in the area of clinical and health research.

The deadline for the 2015 Distinguished Mentor Award is February 16, 2015.  Nominations are now closed.

Eligibility: Nominees must be faculty who have a sustained track record* of successfully mentoring students, fellows and/or early career faculty. Nominees may come from any discipline in any school, department or program at the University of Michigan and need not have any affiliation with MICHR. Nominations are not limited by department or program. You are encouraged to identify faculty who guide students, fellows, and early career faculty throughout their professional training. The successful mentor serves as advisor, teacher, advocate, sponsor, colleague, and collaborator. Only one nomination packet per nominee will be considered by the Award Review Committee.

*A sustained track record would be Associate level or above for tenure-track faculty, or at least ten years of mentoring experience for non-tenure track faculty.

Award: The recipient will receive a plaque and letter of recognition, as well as access to a travel award for a mentee. The MICHR Mentor Council expects to make five awards, adding to the distinguished group of mentor awardees.

Selection Criteria: Nominees should be scholars with a demonstrated commitment to fostering the intellectual, creative, scholarly, and professional growth of their students, fellows, and trainees. They should demonstrate consistent, high quality mentoring in clinical and translational research and be a demonstrated career mentor. Nominations should address the nominee’s contribution to mentoring at the University of Michigan. Criteria that will be used in the review of the nomination packet includes:

  • Communication and relationship management
    • For example: Is an excellent listener, probes, and gives feedback.
  • Psychological support
    • For example: Through guidance and dialogue, enhances capacity of mentees to reflect on and improve relationships.
  • Career and professional development.
    • For example: Provides guidance to help navigate academic/institutional environment and assists with expanding mentees’ professional network.
  • Professional enculturation and scientific inquiry
    • For example: Is a role model of ethical behavior and teaches the rules of science through lab and clinical research meetings.
  • Research development
    • For example: Assists mentee in designing and implementing a research plan.
  • Clinical and translational investigator development
    • For example: Models and advises mentee on building an effective multidisciplinary team.
  • Supports a diverse set of mentees
    • For example: Evidence of supporting women and under-represented minorities** in the health sciences.
**Women, under-represented minority (URM) populations, those with disabilities, those who identify as lesbian, gay, or transgender (LGBT), and those from backgrounds disadvantaged by socio-economic status, cultural or language barriers, or rural geography are all under-represented in the biomedical workforce. More information can be found on the NIH website

More specific criteria can be found on the .pdf instructions.

Nomination Process: Nominations may be submitted by any faculty member, fellow or graduate student at the university, and should be addressed to the Award Review Committee. All nominators should work with their department/program chair and/or associate dean in preparing their nomination package:

 
  • Online Nomination Form
  • A one page nomination letter explaining the reason for the nomination. What about the nominee's qualities and accomplishments that make the individual a superior choice for the award?
  • Letters of support which demonstrate the nominee’s significant contributions to mentoring. At least two letters of these must be from current and/or former mentees of the nominee. The letters of support should not exceed 5 pages.
  • A letter from a chair, associate dean, or senior colleague to address the nominee’s overall mentoring capabilities, not to exceed 1 page.
  • Nominee's CV.
  • A list of mentees including: name of mentee, type of trainee, dates they were mentored, current position-title and location. This table is available for many faculty members through their administrative assistant or research administrator.


Deadline: February 16, 2015.

Nominations should be addressed to the Award Review Committee. Only one nomination packet per nominee will be considered by the Award Review Committee.

Nominations are now closed.


Questions? Contact MICHR-EDU@umich.edu

Selection: Selection of the awardees will be made by consensus of the MICHR Mentor Council and the MICHR Director.

Announcement of the Award: The recipients will be announced in June of 2015.

MICHR Announces Recipients of 2015 Distinguished Mentor Award

The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2015 MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award. The award was established in 2012 in order to recognize and honor the efforts and accomplishments of faculty who foster the intellectual, creative, scholarly, and professional growth of their students, fellows, and trainees in the areas of clinical and translational health and research.

Out of a very competitive field of remarkable and generous research leaders, each of whom contributes enormously to the research environment at U-M, MICHR has selected six individuals who meet the highest standard for clinical and translational research mentorship, and contribute enormously to the research environment at U-M. The pool of nominees represented a diverse group of U-M schools, including Social Work, LS&A, Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy.

Awards will be presented by Dr. S. Jack Hu, Interim Vice President for Research, at the 2015 MICHR Mentor Forum on November 19. The event is free and open to the publicRegister here


Winners of the 2015 MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award 

James L. Abelson, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Anxiety Disorders Program; Academic Director, Ambulatory Services; Medical School 



William Barsan, MD, Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine




Yvonne Lorraine Kapila, DDS, PhD, Professor, H. Marvin Pollard Professor of Gastroenterology; Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology; Professor of Internal Medicine; Medical School



Marci M. Lesperance, MD, Professor and Division Chief, Pediatric Otolaryngology




Bruce A. Mueller, Professor and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, College of Pharmacy




David A. Williams, PhD, Professor, Anesthesiology, Associate Director, Chronic Pain & Fatigue Research Center






Six Faculty Recognized as Outstanding Clinical and Translational Research Mentors

The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) recently celebrated recipients of the 2014 MICHR Distinguished Mentor Award, which recognizes the efforts of University of Michigan faculty members who demonstrate consistent, high quality mentoring in areas of clinical and translational health research. 

 

Out of a competitive field of remarkable and generous research leaders who contribute enormously to the research environment at U-M, MICHR selected six people who meet the highest standards for clinical and translational research mentorship. These standards include a demonstrated commitment to fostering the intellectual, creative, scholarly, and professional growth of their mentees in clinical and translational research.

 

The pool of nominees represented a diverse group of U-M schools, including Engineering, LS&A, Medicine, OVPR, Pharmacy, and Public Health. Awards were presented at the 2014 MICHR Symposium by Vicki Ellingrod, PharmD (MICHR KL2 and mentoring programs faculty lead) and Provost Martha Pollack.

 

Before the 2014 awardees were honored, Dr. Ellingrod debuted a video celebrating mentoring, featuring several past mentor awardees along with their mentees. “Without mentoring, we don’t necessarily know where the next discovery is going to be,” Matt Davis, MD, MAAP, 2012 Mentor Awardee, said in the video. “We could all work alone in our labs or at our desks, without much in the way of conversation, and not really have an idea of how what started as a nugget of a promising insight can turn into a transformational idea.” Watch the mentoring video:


 

As Provost Pollack honored the 2014 awardees, she underscored the themes from the video. “At a research institution like Michigan,” she said, “the emphasis is on the scientific achievements as represented by the thousands or millions of grant dollars awarded, the number of first-author peer-reviewed journal articles in respectable journals, the patents filed, or new drugs approved, or medical devices developed. But the truth is, scientific discoveries and improving human health could not be accomplished without the guidance, knowledge, and constructive criticism of a mentor.”

 

Recipients of the 2014 MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award

Ronald D. Chervin, MD, MS, Professor of Neurology; Michael S. Aldrich Collegiate Professor of Sleep Medicine, Medical School. Dr. Chervin has had an opportunity to mentor exceptionally bright early career faculty, fellows, residents, and students in studies of many conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, asthma, diabetes, obesity, pregnancy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and critical illness. Because sleep is so central to so many aspects to health, Dr. Chervin has launched the careers of numerous researchers, including some of MICHR’s own scholars, shepherding them to K and R success, and beyond. In fact, his mentees populate most of the academic sleep programs across the U.S. The success of Dr. Chervin’s many mentees is a testament to his success as a mentor.

 

Amy E.M. Cohn, Associate Professor and Thurnau Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering; Associate Director of the Center for Healthcare Engineering and Patient Safety, College of Engineering. Dr. Cohn emphasizes the importance of collaborative and diverse research teams, in the spirit of team science. This diversity not only pertains to discipline, but also race and gender. With students from Engineering, Mathematics, the Medical School, Nursing, and Public Health, the diversity of ideas and backgrounds not only enhances the research but also provides a rewarding experience for those involved. Dr. Cohn builds and maintains a culture in her study teams of motivation to aim high and complete challenging projects, and her leadership enables these interdisciplinary teams to succeed.

 

M. Bishr Omary, MD, PhD, H. Marvin Pollard Professor of Gastroenterology; Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology; Professor of Internal Medicine; Medical School. Dr. Omary’s intellectual engagement with mentoring is clear. He has contributed to the literature of mentoring the mentor as well as enhancing the pipeline for underrepresented minorities in academic medicine. To the benefit of his department, Dr. Omary created and supports a postdoctoral club to assist with career options, mentoring, multitasking, work-life balance, manuscript writing and reviewing, and grant preparation. He also mentors the mentors. In his department, he meets with early career faculty to discuss ways to improve the career development plans of their own postdoctoral trainees. In addition to this award, Dr. Omary also received a mentoring award from the American Gastroenterological Association this year.

 

Kathleen A. Stringer, PharmD, Professor of Clinical and Translational Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy. Dr. Stringer is also an affiliate member in the Department of Computational Medicine and Informatics, and a member of the University of Michigan’s Cancer Center. Dr. Stringer fosters clinical and translational research in the College of Pharmacy. Upon her arrival at U-M, she started a research methods course called “Principles of Research and Problem Solving,” which serves as a foundation for all PharmD students. Dr. Stringer has made a huge impact by leading curriculum changes that add to the research elements of the PharmD program, and she has inspired her mentees to improve educational curriculum here at U-M, and even certification changes nationally to the field of pharmacy. Dr. Stringer is also principal investigator on an NIH R15 grant, an Academic Research Enhancement Award or AREA grant, which is intended to expose students to research and to strengthen the research environment of the institution.

 

Pia Maly Sundgren, Adjunct Clinical Professor of Radiology, Medical School; head of the Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Clinical Sciences at Lund University in Sweden. Dr. Sundgren selflessly ensures that her mentees benefit from her professional, international network, providing them with invaluable exposure to potential collaborators or simply introducing them to prominent researchers in their field. Dr. Sundgren has used her networking skills to help residents present abstracts nationally and internationally and to meet the leaders in their field. She also encourages her mentees to meet and interact with physicians from other medical disciplines on their own, in order to get a more global perspective, to exchange ideas, and to seek collaboration. As further testament to Dr. Sundgren’s commitment to mentoring, she has also published on the topic. Even though Dr. Sundgren currently resides in Sweden, she maintains a strong relationship with U-M.

 

Brenda L. Volling, Director and Research Professor, Center for Human Growth and Development, U-M Office of Research, Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Science and the Arts. Dr. Volling is a role model in research ethics and integrity. Dr. Volling’s research tends to be complex, touching on deep theoretical issues that at times can be controversial. But this is where Dr. Volling shines. Students and postdocs working in her lab learn how to do this style of research, and she guides these early career investigators to follow professional integrity. Dr. Volling also believes in the importance of giving back. She shares the results of her research with the people who participate in her studies, going into the community and presenting her findings to them, so that they can see the results and feel the impact of the research themselves.

 


Clinical & Health Mentors Recognized for Outstanding Support of Students and Fellows

The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2013 MICHR Distinguished Mentor Award. The award was established last year to recognize and honor the efforts and accomplishments of U-M faculty members who demonstrate consistent, high quality research and career mentoring in areas of clinical and translational health research. 


Out of a very competitive field of remarkable and generous research leaders, each of whom contributes enormously to the research environment at U-M, MICHR selected nine individuals who meet the highest standard for clinical and translational research mentorship, including a demonstrated commitment to fostering the intellectual, creative, scholarly, and professional growth of their students, fellows, and trainees in clinical and translational research. 
(front row, left to right): D’Silva, Merajver, Harlow
(back row, left to right): Langa, Thornton, Delva, Baghdoyan, Koenig
 


The pool of 30 nominees represented a diverse group of U-M schools, including Nursing, Social Work, Dentistry, Public Health, LS&A, Pharmacy, and Medicine. Awards were presented at the 2013 Research Education Symposium on March 15. 

According to the NIH, having a good mentor is critical to every promising scientist, James O. Woolliscroft, Dean of the U-M Medical School, said at the symposium. “In addition to promoting and enabling scientific inquiry, a good mentor also provides advice and guidance to tackle the myriad of challenges that we all have faced in the development of our careers such as the balance of work and home life, working with collaborators and, of course, the inevitable rejection of papers and grants.” 

Winners of the 2013 MICHR Distinguished Mentor Award

Helen Baghdoyan, PhD, Professor of Anesthesiology; Professor of Pharmacology; Professor of Psychiatry, Medical School. Dr. Baghdoyan studies brain circuitry, looking at the interactions between sleep, mood, and pain. She cultivates her mentees’ confidence by coaching them, giving authentic feedback, and rigorously developing their speaking skills. She also continues to support her mentees even after they’ve left the university. 

Nisha D’Silva, BDS, MSD, PhD, Donald A Kerr Endowed Collegiate Professor of Oral Pathology; Associate Chair, Division of Oral Medicine/Pathology/Radiology; Professor, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry; and Associate Professor of Pathology, Medical School. Dr. D’Silva studies head and neck cancer. She invests a great deal of her time in guiding her mentees, redirecting them when necessary, and helping them focus on what is important.

Jorge Delva, PhD, Professor and Associate Dean for Research, School of Social Work. His research focuses or reducing substance use disorders among at-risk youth in the U.S. and internationally. Dr. Delva exemplifies interdisciplinary mentoring, working broadly and across international boundaries to build the ranks of investigators who are themselves exemplary collaborators.  

Siobán D. Harlow, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology; Director, Center for Integrated Approaches to Complex Diseases, School of Public Health. Dr. Harlow is a reproductive epidemiologist applying statistical methods to understand women’s health across the life span. As the director of the Study of Women’s Health across the Nation Michigan Site (SWAN), Dr. Harlow models leadership and encourages her mentees to take on roles that will promote their careers. Her mentees salute her for appreciating the importance of balancing career and family life. 

Ronald J. Koenig, MD, PhD, Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, Medical School. Dr. Koenig studies thyroid cancer. He has a special ability to recognize and build on his mentees’ strengths, as well as to support them through uncertainty when facing tough career decisions. His mentees know his door is always open. 

Kenneth M. Langa, MD, PhD, Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School; VA Health Services Research & Development (HSR&D) Center for Clinical Management Research; Professor, Institute for Social Research. Dr. Langa studies the epidemiology and costs of chronic disease in older adults. He epitomizes interdisciplinary collaboration and mentoring. He was nominated by two health economists, one critical care physician, one neurologist, two internal medicine physicians, and several full-time research staff. He helps his mentees turn their great ideas into great research.

Sofia Merajver, MD, PhD, Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School; Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health; Scientific Director, Breast Oncology Program; and Director, Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Evaluation Program. Dr. Merajver studies cellular signaling and metabolism in order to understand metastases of aggressive cancers. She is an outstanding educator and makes herself available at critical moments in her mentee’s careers. She pushes her mentees just enough to help them grow. 

Rebecca Thornton, PhD, Assistant Professor of Economics, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Dr. Thornton studies health and education in developing countries with a focus on gender. “Despite her early career level,” Dr. Woolliscroft explained. “The review committee for this award felt that the energetic and consistent support that Dr. Thornton offers her mentees deserved recognition. She exemplifies helping others as an academic value.” 

John T. Wei, MD, MS, Professor and Associate Chair for Research, Department of Urology, Medical School. Dr. Wei has championed mentoring in his department. He founded a urology training program that has helped accelerate the health services research careers of legions of promising urologic investigators. His mentees appreciate the hard discussions that Dr. Wei has with them because they often yield the greatest personal growth. 


The 2012 MICHR Distinguished Mentor Awardees

The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2012 MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award. The award was established in order to recognize and honor the efforts and accomplishments of faculty who demonstrate consistent, high quality research and career mentoring in areas of clinical and translational health and research.

Eight awardees were selected from a wide field of highly qualified nominees.

A special award, the 2012 MICHR Lifetime Achievement Award for Mentoring in Clinical and Translational Research, was presented to David E. Schteingart, MD, Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, Medical School. Dr. Schteingart (right, with award presenter Charles Burant, MD) mentored more than 100 people during his long and distinguished career at U-M.

Winners of the 2012 MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award

Frederic C. Blow, PhD, Professor and Research Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Medical School; Research Associate Professor, UMTRI; and Adjunct Professor of Psychology, College of LS&A

Dean E. Brenner, MD, Kutsche Memorial Chair of Internal Medicine, Professor of Internal Medicine, and Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School

Thomas E. Carey, PhD, Donald A. Kerr Endowed Collegiate Professor, Distinguished Senior Research Scientist, Kresge Hearing Research Institute; Professor of Otorhinolaryngology; and Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School

Ruth C. Carlos, MD, Professor of Radiology, Medical School

Daniel J. Clauw, MD, Professor of Internal Medicine, Professor of Anesthesiology, and Professor of Psychiatry, Medical School

Matthew M. Davis, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School; and Associate Professor of Public Policy, School of Public Policy

Vicki L. Ellingrod, PharmD, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Medical School

Anna S. Lok, MBBS, Alice Lohrman Andrews Research Professor of Gastroenterology and Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School 


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