MICHR-Supported 'MILES' Research Shows Young, Black Women at Highest Risk for Lupus

There is a very poor understanding of what causes lupus. Identifying the population and dynamics involved helps us target our resources more effectively and better recognize risk factors for the development and progression of the disease,” says lead author Emily Somers, Ph.D., Sc.M

There is a very poor understanding of what causes lupus. Identifying the population and dynamics involved helps us target our resources more effectively and better recognize risk factors for the development and progression of the disease,” says lead author Emily Somers, Ph.D., Sc.M

Young, black women have the highest rate of developing lupus and are most likely to be diagnosed at a younger age than whites and during childbearing years, according to a new U-M study of lupus in Southeastern Michigan. The findings are based on data collected as part of the Michigan Lupus Epidemiology & Surveillanc (MILES) program, a public health initiative in conjunction with the Michigan Department of Community Health.  

MICHR has supported lead author Emily Somers, PhD, ScM and the MILES program in a number of ways, including an enormous amount of work in project management, data abstraction, and data management. In addition, Dr. Somers was a 2006 PTSP scholar and now facilitates groups and mentors other scholars for the Responsible Conduct of Research for K Awardees series and the MICHR Research Studio. 

Read the full UMHS article.